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    Scotland secures reputation at heart of global tidal revolution with peak power tidal device

    Picture courtesy of Nick Cross

     

    ENERGY INDUSTRY EXPERTS celebrated news that Scotland has the most powerful tidal energy device in the world after the 500 tonne floating tidal turbine in Orkney exported a full 2 Megawatts (MW) of power into the local grid at the weekend. 

    They state that device developed in Scotland in a European energy research facility funded by the EU hit peak power and as a result has secured Scotland’s position as a global leader in renewable energy.

    Developed and built by one of Scotland’s leading engineering companies, Scotrenewables based in Orkney, the SR2000 device can generate enough energy to power about 1,000 homes a year, making it the world’s most powerful tidal turbine. “It further demonstrates that through dogged, unrelenting innovation tidal energy is getting ever closer to becoming part of our carbon-free energy mix.” Neil Kermode

    Neil Kermode, managing director at the European Marine Energy Centre (EMEC) in Orkney said: “Everybody at EMEC offers their congratulations to Scotrenewables in reaching peak power on the SR2000. This milestone is a testament to years of hard work and dedication shown by the Scotrenewables team. It further demonstrates that through dogged, unrelenting innovation tidal energy is getting ever closer to becoming part of our carbon-free energy mix.”

    The SR2000 is the culmination of more than 12 years of engineering research being built at Harland and Wolf Heavy Industries’ shipyard in Belfast before being towed to Orkney in May. It is 10ft wide, 200ft long and weighs 550 tonnes.

    Andrew Scott, CEO of Scotrenewables, added: “We are tremendously excited to have the SR2000 demonstrating the performance and cost advantages of our floating tidal technology, in line with forecasts, whilst delivering new benchmarks within the tidal sector. This performance resets the bar for the costs of delivering tidal power. Achieving this industry milestone is a goal the team at Scotrenewables have worked tirelessly towards for a long time – the credit lies with them for these fantastic achievements.”“This performance resets the bar for the costs of delivering tidal power.” Andrew Scott

    Scotland has had to rely on European money and logistical aid to complete such ambitious projects as the UK Government has been quick to reduce or completely slash any subsidy for renewable projects saying that they should be left to “stand on their own.”

    Companies such as the French energy giant Total SR are part of a group including European universities which have paid for research facilities and contributed to project running costs. Speaking to CommonSpace a spokesperson for Julien Pouget, ‎senior vice-president for renewables at Total, said: “For Total, contributing to the development of renewable energies is as much a strategic choice as an industrial responsibility.”

     

    Polluted air can generate power
    Magnetism: New switching process in non-volatile spintronics devices