Revolution-Green http://revolution-green.com Alternative Energy News Fri, 17 Nov 2017 19:46:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.3 Secret Weapon: This Supersonic Blaster Rebuilds Jet Parts With Flying Powder – Cold Spray Printing http://revolution-green.com/secret-weapon-supersonic-blaster-rebuilds-jet-parts-flying-powder-cold-spray-printing/ http://revolution-green.com/secret-weapon-supersonic-blaster-rebuilds-jet-parts-flying-powder-cold-spray-printing/#respond Fri, 17 Nov 2017 19:46:39 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17178 There are other differences. While traditional 3D printers build parts from computer files, the cold-spray machine uses digital scans of actual jet engine parts to accurately reconstruct the broken part.

The post Secret Weapon: This Supersonic Blaster Rebuilds Jet Parts With Flying Powder – Cold Spray Printing appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
Agcat-  Similar to 3D pinting,but not, this is kinetic fusing of metals, aa cold process in a sense, with hot results

Secret Weapon: This Supersonic Blaster Rebuilds Jet Parts With Flying Powder – Cold Spray Printing.  Unlike 3D printing, as it produces parts directly from scanning new parts or repairs are made from the same scan.  A few years ago, scientists working in GE labs in upstate New York came up with a cool idea for fixing broken parts. Literally. Calling the approach “cold spray,” they shot tiny metal grains from a supersonic nozzle at aircraft engine blades to add new material to them without changing their properties.

Anteneh Kebbede, manager of the Coatings and Surface Lab at the GE Global Research Center, who helped developed cold spray, said the technology can build whole new parts with walls as thick as 1 inch or more. “For manufacturers, the potential benefits are enormous,” Kebbede says. “Imagine being able to restore an aging part to its original condition with a tool that looks like a spray gun.” It is “like a fountain of youth for machine parts.”

GE engineers have already taken a dip. Earlier this year, engineers at the GE Aviation subsidiary Avio Aero started testing the technology in Bari, Italy. Last month they used it to repair the first part: a gearbox from the world’s most powerful jet engine, the GE90.

The milestone was an important one. Cold spray, like 3D printing, is one of several additive manufacturing methods that build parts from the ground up by adding material to them, rather than cutting it away.

But even in the high-tech additive family, cold spray is a rare species. Most 3D printers for metals use lasers to heat up powdered titanium, and other metals, and fuse them to build new parts layer by layer. That technique works well for printing new components directly from a computer file. But heating up an existing part can alter its crystalline structure and mechanical properties. “When you heat up metal and then cool it again, it changes in the same way powder snow can become a sheet of ice after a warm spell,” said Gregorio Dimagli, repair development manager at Avio Aero.

https://s3.amazonaws.com/dsg.files.app.content.prod/gereports/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/15102910/IMG_5801-768x576.jpg

 Top and above: Cold spray, like 3D printing, is one of several additive manufacturing methods that build parts from the ground up by adding material to them, rather than cutting it away. Images credit: Avio Aero.

At Bari, the cold-spray process happens in a metal chamber the size of a walk-in refrigerator. The chamber holds a robotic arm with an attached supersonic nozzle that sprays metallic powder particles, as small as 5 microns, onto the piece that needs to be fixed. They hit the surface with so much energy they form a diffusion bond with the part. “Every single metal particle from the powder-charged gun attaches to the part of the component for reconstruction or repair due to the effect of the kinetics,” explains Giulio Longo, the lead repair development engineer in the Bari laboratory.There are other differences. While traditional 3D printers build parts from computer files, the cold-spray machine uses digital scans of actual jet engine parts to accurately reconstruct the broken part.

The work happening at Bari is the result of a seven-year partnership between Avio Aero and the Polytechnic University of Bari. At the Apulia Repair Development Center, located on the Bari campus, GE engineers work with professors and experts in mechanical engineering to create new ways to build, maintain and repair aircraft parts. As they develop best practices for these new technologies, expect to see additive manufacturing become a more important part of aircraft engine repair in the coming years.

The post Secret Weapon: This Supersonic Blaster Rebuilds Jet Parts With Flying Powder – Cold Spray Printing appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/secret-weapon-supersonic-blaster-rebuilds-jet-parts-flying-powder-cold-spray-printing/feed/ 0
GE’s Huge 3D Metal Printer Makes Aircraft Parts – Want An Aircraft Part Quick? http://revolution-green.com/ges-huge-3d-metal-printer-makes-aircraft-parts-want-aircraft-part-quick/ http://revolution-green.com/ges-huge-3d-metal-printer-makes-aircraft-parts-want-aircraft-part-quick/#respond Fri, 17 Nov 2017 19:16:03 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17174 GE has the ability to print parts as large as 1 meter in diameter directly from a computer file.

The post GE’s Huge 3D Metal Printer Makes Aircraft Parts – Want An Aircraft Part Quick? appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
Agcat-  This is a short article but worthy of note as it illustrates the rapid advances being made with 3D printing, especially in metals.

GE has unveiled its previously-announced 3D metal printer, suitable for making aircraft parts. At the manufacturing trade show formnext in Germany, the GE Additive team revealed the as-yet-unnamed machine, demonstrating its ability to print parts as large as 1 meter in diameter directly from a computer file. Using additive manufacturing technology, the machine fuses together thin layers of metal powder with a 1-kilowatt laser.

The machine has the potential to build even larger parts, too, thanks to its scalable nature, plus its design can be configured to add more lasers if required. Mohammad Ehteshami, part of GE‘s Project ATLAS team (Additive Technology Large Area System), said it had already been used to print a jet combustor liner. “It can also be applicable for manufacturers in the automotive, power and space industries,” he added.

The printer, which is still in beta stage, draws on additive manufacturing technology which is already being used by several GE businesses. GE Aviation is building the Advanced Turboprop, a commercial aircraft engine made largely of 3D parts. Using the technology designers reduced 855 separate parts down to just 12. According to Ehteshami, the machine is “an engineer’s dream”.

Rachel England  Engadget

                                                                                      https://s.yimg.com/ny/api/res/1.2/6jU2kFS.85iT3GXc1bjjCA--/YXBwaWQ9aGlnaGxhbmRlcjtzbT0xO3c9ODAw/http://media.zenfs.com/en-US/homerun/engadget_479/fdab73c5fa570a1c88069bf1399eb320

                               GE has unveiled its previously-announced 3D metal printer, suitable for making aircraft parts.

 

The post GE’s Huge 3D Metal Printer Makes Aircraft Parts – Want An Aircraft Part Quick? appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/ges-huge-3d-metal-printer-makes-aircraft-parts-want-aircraft-part-quick/feed/ 0
High Energy 3D Accumulator http://revolution-green.com/high-energy-3d-accumulator/ http://revolution-green.com/high-energy-3d-accumulator/#respond Fri, 17 Nov 2017 07:06:49 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17169 This is an interesting technology brought to our attention by one of our readers (sfuchs) The video is really worthwhile watching especially taking to the battery with a pick axe A True Innovation in Batteries The HE3DA®  nanotechnology utilizes the high charge and discharge speed of nanomaterials, resulting in superior safety and many new properties […]

The post High Energy 3D Accumulator appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>

This is an interesting technology brought to our attention by one of our readers (sfuchs)

The video is really worthwhile watching especially taking to the battery with a pick axe

A True Innovation in Batteries

The HE3DA®  nanotechnology utilizes the high charge and discharge speed of nanomaterials, resulting in superior safety and many new properties of Li-accumulator modules that were heretofore unthinkable.The HE3DA® nanotechnological platform moves the frontier of lithium accumulators decades forward.

Claims

Technical parameters

HE3DA technology offers top-class technical parameters:

  • Battery system capacity up to 500 Wh/liter

  • Kilowatt hour module offers fifteen times higher peak power than currently used technologies.

  • Efficiency above 95%

  • Lifespan 5000 cycles

Economic parameters

HE3DA technology achieves top-class economic parameters:

  • Low cell production costs:

    • Simplicity of production yields low capital expenditure and production costs.

    • Use of standard production materials and the absence of ballast result in low material costs.

  • Low cost of installation into large capacity storage systems:

    • Low cooling requirements and internal electrolyte cooling.

    • Ability to use a new, simple battery management system.

  • Low operational costs allowed by high efficiency and low O&M requirements.

= Low overall electricity storage costs = Mass utilization of batteries in energy sector and other industries.

 

Advantages

Flexibility of use

The capacity and charge/discharge time of the accumulator can be adjusted by choosing a particular electrode thickness. This allows for tailor-made solutions and a number of applications of HE3DA accumulators and represents a huge potential for development.

Ability to construct large cells

The HE3DA technology enables construction of cells an order of magnitudes larger than are currently produced by conventional technologies. This is allowed by low production of heat and the ability to cool the cells efficiently by internal cooling of the electrolyte

Safety

HE3DA technology is inherently safe. Due to lower internal resistance, robust separators and the absence of any organic materials (except for the electrolyte), the HE3DA accumulator cannot burn or explode due to a short circuit. The battery can operate in a potentiostatic regime, which serves as a protection against overcharging.

Future development potential

Currently used 2D lithium accumulators have reached their technical limits. Many issues still remain, particularly safety. Producers are now focusing mainly on lowering prices, seeking economies of scale by constructing huge production facilities.

Recyclability

Today the recycling cost of a battery is approx. 5% of the battery’s value, reflecting the cost of ecological disposal.

An HE3DA accumulator is 100% recyclable.

Applications

Balancing and stabilization of high capacity battery systems

HE3DA has developed an accumulator suitable for mass application
in the energy sector. Its parameters enable utilization for:

  • Peak balancing

  • Frequency regulation

  • Island networks

  • Stabilization of renewables

  • Power back up

  • Volt/VAR control

The main HE3DA module for the energy sector has a capacity
of 1 MWh and is composed of 125 eight-kWh cells. The total
dimensions of the module are 8,6 m3, including all external systems.

The modules can be easily fitted into large energy storage systems.
The installation of the HE3DA battery system is very simple due to the small number of cells and the  innovative BMS concept.  The systems are virtually maintenance free.

Car industry

HE3DA technology can currently be utilized for the automotive industry in the applications . listed below. All these applications will be developed to the production stage at the latest by mid-2016.

12V car battery

HE3DA technology enables construction of safe single-cell lithium car batteries. The batteries meet all necessary requirements, including operating temperature.

50V car battery

50V car batteries will allow many innovations in the car industry. When car makers are ready, HE3DA will be able to supply the batteries..

Accumulators for electric vehicles

HE3DA is a step in the direction toward a safe and affordable high-power accumulator with a fast charging time. Currently achieved parameters of HE3DA battery for electric vehicles are:

  • Energy density of battery system 520 Wh/liter

Other applications

Special batteries

Efforts to achieve parameters which are now only seen as the frontier of development are the engine of future development. Therefore, we want to focus on our R&D as well as production of special batteries that will push our abilities even further.

  • Aviation and astronautics

  • Micro-batteries

 

Reference: https://www.he3da.cz/copy-of-domu

The post High Energy 3D Accumulator appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/high-energy-3d-accumulator/feed/ 0
Power a car for 500 miles and recharge in a minute http://revolution-green.com/power-car-500-miles-recharge-minute/ http://revolution-green.com/power-car-500-miles-recharge-minute/#comments Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:39:29 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17165 As Simon will always question, charging a battery that can run a car for 500 miles in one minute will need a pretty impressive set of cables to do so. This claim may be realistic in that they are looking 6 years out before commercial production. Electric car-maker Fisker has filed patents for flexible solid-state […]

The post Power a car for 500 miles and recharge in a minute appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>

As Simon will always question, charging a battery that can run a car for 500 miles in one minute will need a pretty impressive set of cables to do so. This claim may be realistic in that they are looking 6 years out before commercial production.

Electric car-maker Fisker has filed patents for flexible solid-state battery technology that could slash charging times and improve range.

  • The new battery uses a three-dimensional structure to increase surface area
  • Fisker says it could allow for 500 mile range, and charging in just one minute
  • The technology will be on display at the Consumer Electronics Show in Jan 

2.5 times the energy density of typical lithium ion

According to Fisker, the radical new battery would deliver 2.5 times the energy density of typical lithium ion batteries.

Solid-state batteries are known to have a number of limitations, such as low power and low rate capability as a result of the layered electrode structure, and issues arising from cold temperatures, the firm explains.

But, the new technology attempts to overcome the challenges using a three-dimensional solid-state structure.

This allows the electrodes to cover 25 times more surface area than flat thin-film designs.

‘This breakthrough marks the beginning of a new era in solid-state materials and manufacturing technologies,’ said Dr. Fabio Albano, VP of battery systems at Fisker Inc.

‘We are addressing all of the hurdles that solid-state batteries have encountered on the path to commercialization, such as performance in cold temperatures; the use of low cost and scalable manufacturing methods; and the ability to form bulk solid-state electrodes with significant thickness and high active material loadings.

‘We are excited to build on this foundation and move the needle in energy storage.’

Making the impossible, possible

‘Our aggressive vision for the entire EV and automotive industry, not just for Fisker Inc., revolves around making the impossible, possible – and this global solid-state battery breakthrough is reflective of our utmost seriousness in making that vision a reality,’ said Henrik Fisker, chairman and CEO of Fisker Inc.

‘It used to be about the efficiency of the gasoline engine. Now, it’s all about who breaks the code and smashes the barriers to future battery technologies that will enable mass market electrification.

‘Our scientists have been working tirelessly to deliver. We’ve done it, and this is just the beginning.’

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5083367/Fisker-patent-solid-state-battery-charges-MINUTE.html#ixzz4yeXIaq5Q

 

 

 

The post Power a car for 500 miles and recharge in a minute appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/power-car-500-miles-recharge-minute/feed/ 2
The Firm That Can 3D Print Human Body Parts – This Is 3D Bioprinting http://revolution-green.com/firm-can-3d-print-human-body-parts-3d-bioprinting/ http://revolution-green.com/firm-can-3d-print-human-body-parts-3d-bioprinting/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 18:31:16 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17157 The process looks something like a hi-tech sewing machine weaving an emblem onto a garment.

But soon the pattern begins to rise and swell, and a nose, constructed using a bio-ink containing real human cells, grows upwards from the glass, glowing brightly under an ultraviolet light.

The post The Firm That Can 3D Print Human Body Parts – This Is 3D Bioprinting appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
Agcat-

The Firm That Can 3D Print Human Body Parts – This Is 3D Bioprinting.  Erik Gatenholm grins widely as he presses the start button on a 3D printer, instructing it to print a life-size human nose. It sparks a frenzied 30-minute burst of energy from the printer, as its thin metal needle buzzes around a Petri dish, distributing light blue ink in a carefully programmed order. The process looks something like a hi-tech sewing machine weaving an emblem onto a garment. But soon the pattern begins to rise and swell, and a nose, constructed using a bio-ink containing real human cells, grows upwards from the glass, glowing brightly under an ultraviolet light. This is 3D bioprinting, and it’s almost too obvious to point out that it’s potential reads like something from a science fiction story.

All images for this article were special copywrited please go to this URL address to see the complete article and see video

https://www.yahoo.com/news/m/66ff35a9-d2d4-3e97-84c9-18bac70a1633/the-firm-that-can-3d-print.html

t sparks a frenzied 30-minute burst of energy from the printer, as its thin metal needle buzzes around a Petri dish, distributing light blue ink in a carefully programmed order.

The process looks something like a hi-tech sewing machine weaving an emblem onto a garment.

But soon the pattern begins to rise and swell, and a nose, constructed using a bio-ink containing real human cells, grows upwards from the glass, glowing brightly under an ultraviolet light.

This is 3D bioprinting, and it’s almost too obvious to point out that its potential reads like something from a science fiction novel.

Currently focused on growing cartilage and skin cells suitable for testing drugs and cosmetics, Erik, 28, believes that within 20 years it could be used to produce organs that are actually fit for human implantation.

Erik is the chief executive and co-founder of a small Swedish company called Cellink. Founded in Gothenburg only a year ago, it is a world leader in bioprinting, and Erik has big ambitions.

Image copyright Cellink
Image caption Erik Gatenholm (left) and co-founder Hector Martínez have very big ambitions for Cellink

“The goal [from the start] was to change the world of medicine – it was as simple as that,” he says. “And our idea was to place our technology in every single lab around the world.”

A former management student, Erik was first introduced to 3D bioprinters three years ago by his father Paul Gatenholm, a professor in chemistry and biopolymer technology at Chalmers University in Gothenburg.

The entrepreneurial Erik realised that there was a gap in the market for bio-ink, the liquid into which human cells can be mixed and then 3D printed. At Cellink this ink is made from cellulose sourced from Swedish forests, and alginate formed from seaweed in the Norwegian Sea.

Back in 2014, the bio-ink required to carry out cellular research by academics and pharmaceutical companies was typically mixed in-house by researchers and not available to buy online.

But Erik came up with a plan to market Chalmers University’s bio-ink technology and become the first company in the world to sell standardised inks over the internet suitable for mixing with any cell type. He would sell these inks alongside affordable 3D printers.

Image caption The bio-ink is a liquid in which human cells can live

Erik’s “lightbulb moment” was in 2015, and the following year, aged just 25, he co-founded the aptly-named Cellink with Hector Martinez, a tissue engineering student at Chambers.

Cellink quickly attracted numerous investors, and within 10 months of launching it had listed on First North, the Nasdaq stock exchange’s market for emerging companies. The flotation valued the firm at $16.8m (£12.8m).

Achieving sales of $1.5m in its first year, it now has 30 employees and has opened three offices in the US in addition to its Swedish headquarters. It boasts customers in more than 40 countries.

“We said that we wanted to grow the company and from day one it was a global business,” says Erik. “We understood that the customers are everywhere”.

Image copyright Cellink
Image caption Cellink now has a second office in Boston, Massachusetts

With the bio-inks priced between $9 and $299, and the company’s printers between $10,000 and $39,000, most of Cellink’s sales have so far been to academic institutions in the US, Asia and Europe, including Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Harvard University and University College London.

But pharmaceutical firms are also increasingly using Cellink’s technology to develop products, by conducting tests on bioprinted human tissues, potentially reducing the need for animal trials in the process.

The company puts its rapid global expansion down to a range of factors, including access to existing technologies already developed for standard 3D printers, a strong online presence through videos and social media, and plenty of traditional, face-to-face contact with clients.

“We go to the customer. We spend days there. We train them and ensure that they are up and running,” says Erik. “It’s the time that you spend with the customer where you truly learn what they need.”

Image copyright Cellink
Image caption Some people have ethical concerns about bioprinting

Iris Ohrn, a life sciences investment advisor at Business Region Gothenburg, the state-funded company working to increase investment in the city, says that Erik’s confident and friendly persona has helped Cellink to grow.

“When you meet Erik, you get the feeling ‘this guy is going to succeed’ no matter which company he starts,” she says.

But taking risks, argues Ms Ohrn, was also an essential factor in Cellink’s expansion.

She says that while bioprinting offers “incredible potential” when it comes to “drug testing, organ transportation and wound healing”, the start-up took a gamble by launching its products before the human tissue market was fully developed.

Image copyright Cellink
Image caption The firm sells both the 3D printers and the bio-ink

Ms Ohrn adds that Cellink also correctly realised that it had quickly expand overseas quickly because “the Swedish market is very small”.

“If you’re going to succeed [as a Swedish firm] you need to go international very quick,” she says.

Cellink’s meteoric rise has, however, not been without its challenges or controversies.

Erik admits that his core team has needed to work hard to understand local laws and safety regulations, and to provide a 24-hour service for customers spread across the world.

“You’ve always got to be available,” he says. “It doesn’t matter what time it is at your location… you’re carrying two or three phones just so you can comply with all the different time zones.”

Erik hopes that the recent opening of its US headquarters in Boston will allow it to grow even further thanks to “employee spill-over” from major American pharmaceutical firms and universities.

“Being in that area, we have the ability to pick some of the most brilliant minds in the world,” he says.

Meanwhile Cellink is planning ahead to reach its much longer-term goal – to help solve a global shortfall in organs available for transplants.

Many experts in the field predict that bioprinting could be used to create functioning organs for implantation within 10 to 20 years, a possibility that opens up a minefield of ethical concerns that are set to keep the company on its toes as it continues to grow.

“A lot of people could think that bioprinting is ‘playing God’,” admits Erik.

https://ichef.bbci.co.uk/news/624/cpsprodpb/1380A/production/_98728897_cellinkbioprintinggfx.png

Image caption The global market for bioprinting is expected to expand greatly

But he argues that his firm is in favour of a climate that encourages scrutiny and regulation as the market evolves, and says that Cellink is already starting to work closely with relevant medical bodies and institutions.

He says that collaborating on safety tests and standards will ensure that the emerging bioprinting industry doesn’t end up transforming its science fiction script into a horror movie.

“I believe in this. This is my passion. I live for this and I just don’t see that any regrets are very vivid today,” he says.

The post The Firm That Can 3D Print Human Body Parts – This Is 3D Bioprinting appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/firm-can-3d-print-human-body-parts-3d-bioprinting/feed/ 0
New 3D-Printing Technique Uses UV Light To Print Working Electronic Circuits http://revolution-green.com/new-3d-printing-technique-uses-uv-light-print-working-electronic-circuits/ http://revolution-green.com/new-3d-printing-technique-uses-uv-light-print-working-electronic-circuits/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 18:05:13 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17153 The researchers’ new approach involves printing circuits made of electrically conductive metallic inks and insulating polymeric inks. These can be produced in a single inkjet printing process, using an ultraviolet light to solidify the inks.

The post New 3D-Printing Technique Uses UV Light To Print Working Electronic Circuits appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>

Agcat-

 

New 3D-Printing Technique Uses UV Light To Print Working Electronic Circuits.  If you’re an electrical engineer, 3D printing has long been a valuable tool for carrying out tasks like printing prototype housings or cases for your projects. But the 3D printing of electronic components themselves is also a growing field. This is something researchers from the U.K.’s University of Nottingham are helping with — courtesy of a newly invented “breakthrough” approach to printing fully functional electronic circuits that could help transform the way we create components.  “Here at the Center for Additive Manufacturing, we’re exploring ways of developing additive manufacturing beyond single material deposition to the ability to manufacture a working system straight out of the machine,” Professor Chris Tuck, professor of materials engineering and lead investigator of the study, told Digital Trends.

                                                                                    

Credit:  Luke Dormehl  November,14, 2017 digital Trends

The researchers’ new approach involves printing circuits made of electrically conductive metallic inks and insulating polymeric inks. These can be produced in a single inkjet printing process, using an ultraviolet light to solidify the inks. This solidification process takes less than one minute per layer, which is far quicker than other approaches that made it impractical to consider printing objects with hundreds of different layers.

                                                                                            uv light 3d printing circuits researchhighlight3

                                                                uv light 3d printing circuits researchhighlight3

The approach also allows for the printing of multiple materials in one object. The researchers hope that this will make it possible to print more ambitious electronic items in the future — for example, a wristband with both pressure sensor and wireless communication circuitry.

“This means we can begin to explore producing three-dimensional circuits and structures in a single manufacturing step,” Tuck continued. As with 3D printing as a whole, what makes this work exciting is that engineers would be able to more easily customize each item to a certain use case.

Tuck’s colleague, engineering research fellow Ehab Saleh, told us that the team has already been approached to use the technique to work on some “exciting applications,” although the researchers are not able to reveal specifics as of yet. “The outcome of the work could enable many real-world applications in electronics where a complete device with a complex geometry could be 3D printed with a press of a button,” Saleh said.

A paper describing the work was recently published in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies.

The post New 3D-Printing Technique Uses UV Light To Print Working Electronic Circuits appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/new-3d-printing-technique-uses-uv-light-print-working-electronic-circuits/feed/ 0
New Laser Technique Promises Photonic Devices Inside Of Silicon http://revolution-green.com/new-laser-technique-promises-photonic-devices-inside-silicon/ http://revolution-green.com/new-laser-technique-promises-photonic-devices-inside-silicon/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 17:24:12 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17150 n research described in the journal Nature Photonics, the Turkey-based researchers have developed a 3D laser fabrication technique that deliberately creates the conditions for exploiting these interactions, known as nonlinear feedback mechanisms.

The post New Laser Technique Promises Photonic Devices Inside Of Silicon appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>

Agcat-

 

New Laser Technique Promises Photonic Devices Inside Of Silicon.  When a laser beam modifies a material, those modifications can either be temporary or permanent, and the change can also be either extremely subtle or drastic. In any case, once such a modification has taken place, the modified material starts responding differently to the laser beam.  This interaction between the laser beam and the modified materials is typically overlooked or even actively prevented because it’s viewed as an undesired artifact. However, researchers at Bilkent University and Middle East Technical University (both in Ankara, Turkey) have taken advantage of these interactions to create structures within silicon that enable photonic devices.

An artificially coloured view of a micro-cityscape created out of Si.

                        Image: Bilkent University/Nature Photonics  An artificially coloured view of a micro-cityscape created out of Si.

Credit:  By Dexter Johnson  Posted

“In order to differentiate these elements from their “on-chip” counterparts, we have coined the term “in-chip,” explains Onur Tokel, an assistant professor at Bilkent who was the lead author of the paper. “So far, the field of silicon-photonics has occupied itself primarily with on-chip photonics, which has been fantastically successful. We now envision and demonstrate proof-of-concept silicon-photonics in-chip elements to complement these.”

To arrive at their new 3D laser fabrication technique, the Tokel and his colleagues Serim Ilday and Fatih Omer Ilday looked specifically at what conditions would allow a positive feedback loop between modifications of the material and the corresponding effect on the laser beam (its absorption, scattering, diffraction, focusing, etc.).

When a positive feedback is set up, it becomes possible for even subtle changes to build up iteratively, rapidly, and often exponentially. After the changes cross a certain threshold, the modification in the material becomes permanent. So, the key to the researchers’ approach is to exploit nonlinearities in the form of positive feedback loops, according to Tokel.

In the approach adopted by Tokel and his colleagues, thermal energy is built up on the material through a succession of extremely high repetition frequency pulses, but at low energy. “The bottom line is that large numbers of tiny pulses were shown to ablate more efficiently, faster and with much reduced thermal damage than a single, giant pulse,” said Tokel.  Tokel and his colleagues used nanosecond lasers that have existed for more than a decade. However, the researchers particular approach to using this technology was the key to being able to modify silicon in this novel way.   To start, the researchers used a nanosecond pulsed fiber laser, with a center frequency of 1.55 micrometers, where silicon is transparent. This allows the beam to penetrate beneath the surface of the chip, initiating certain feedback mechanisms based on nonlinear absorption. Ultimately, this created permanently modified areas inside the crystal with spherical volumes of roughly 1 µm.

In principle, the technique allows for the movement from point to point in the chip, for directly writing any desired 3D “in-chip” architecture sequentially—one pulse at a time, according to Tokel.  However, there is a catch: Creating buried (or in-chip) devices on cubic-millimeter scales using such point-to-point processing would require between 100 million and 10 billion separate beam-positioning steps, assuming 1-micrometer resolution. Tokel concedes that this would make the actual use of the method a practical impossibility, even with the fastest beam positioning equipment currently in use.

But Tokel hit upon another critical realization: Many practical components could be made out of self-organizing rod- or needle-like building blocks. These rod-like structures, generated due to the same nonlinear feedback effects that create the point-like modifications, also preserve a width of about 1 micrometer for each block.  What’s more, these rods, which elongate along the direction of beam propagation, can be assembled to create a 2D layer, or even more complex 3D shapes, which can be created by scanning the laser beam over the chip. “This is how in-chip optical devices, including holograms, gratings, lenses, microelements such as microfluidic channels or large-area-covering arrays are created,” said Tokel.

With this new capability, Tokel believes that he and his colleagues are at the point of conceiving a new way to realize a “lab-in-a-chip” system.  He adds: “We can also imagine hybrid-systems, with in-chip photonics integrated to electronics and microfluidics parts, thus complementing them. These can incorporate waveguides for data transfer, holograms for diffractive optics, and other microparts to realize advanced biosensors, when coupled with meandering networks of channels.”

 

The post New Laser Technique Promises Photonic Devices Inside Of Silicon appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/new-laser-technique-promises-photonic-devices-inside-silicon/feed/ 0
Butterfly wing inspires photovoltaics: Light absorption can be enhanced by up to 200 percent http://revolution-green.com/butterfly-wing-inspires-photovoltaics-light-absorption-can-enhanced-200-percent/ http://revolution-green.com/butterfly-wing-inspires-photovoltaics-light-absorption-can-enhanced-200-percent/#respond Wed, 15 Nov 2017 13:22:33 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17146 Nanostructures optimize light absorption in black butterflies — principle can be transferred to photovoltaics for improving light harvesting in thin-film solar cells — cell efficiency increase Light absorption rate by up to 200 percent Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that […]

The post Butterfly wing inspires photovoltaics: Light absorption can be enhanced by up to 200 percent appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>

Nanostructures optimize light absorption in black butterflies — principle can be transferred to photovoltaics for improving light harvesting in thin-film solar cells — cell efficiency increase

Nanostructures of the wing of Pachliopta aristolochiae can be transferred to solar cells and enhance their absorption rates by up to 200 percent. CREDIT: Graphics: Radwanul H. Siddique, KIT/Caltech)

Light absorption rate by up to 200 percent

Sunlight reflected by solar cells is lost as unused energy. The wings of the butterfly Pachliopta aristolochiae are drilled by nanostructures (nanoholes) that help absorbing light over a wide spectrum far better than smooth surfaces. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now succeeded in transferring these nanostructures to solar cells and, thus, enhancing their light absorption rate by up to 200 percent. The scientists report their results in the journal Science Advances. DOI: 10.1126/sciadv.1700232.

“The butterfly studied by us is very dark black. This signifies that it perfectly absorbs sunlight for optimum heat management. Even more fascinating than its appearance are the mechanisms that help reaching the high absorption. The optimization potential when transferring these structures to photovoltaics (PV) systems was found to be much higher than expected,” says Dr. Hendrik Hölscher of KIT’s Institute of Microstructure Technology (IMT).

The scientists of the team of Hendrik Hölscher and Radwanul H. Siddique (formerly KIT, now Caltech) reproduced the butterfly’s nanostructures in the silicon absorbing layer of a thin-film solar cell. Subsequent analysis of light absorption yielded promising results: Compared to a smooth surface, the absorption rate of perpendicular incident light increases by 97% and rises continuously until it reaches 207% at an angle of incidence of 50 degrees. “This is particularly interesting under European conditions. Frequently, we have diffuse light that hardly falls on solar cells at a vertical angle,” Hendrik Hölscher says.

However, this does not automatically imply that efficiency of the complete PV system is enhanced by the same factor, says Guillaume Gomard of IMT. “Also other components play a role. Hence, the 200 percent are to be considered a theoretical limit for efficiency enhancement.”

Prior to transferring the nanostructures to solar cells, the researchers determined the diameter and arrangement of the nanoholes on the wing of the butterfly by means of scanning electron microscopy. Then, they analyzed the rates of light absorption for various hole patterns in a computer simulation. They found that disordered holes of varying diameters, such as those found in the black butterfly, produced most stable absorption rates over the complete spectrum at variable angles of incidence, with respect to periodically arranged monosized nanoholes. Hence, the researchers introduced disorderly positioned holes in a thin-film PV absorber, with diameters varying from 133 to 343 nanometers.

The scientists demonstrated that light yield can be enhanced considerably by removing material. In the project, they worked with hydrogenated amorphous silicon. According to the researchers, however, any type of thin-film PV technology can be improved with such nanostructures, also on the industrial scale.

Background information:

Thin-film PV modules represent an economically attractive alternative to conventional crystalline silicon solar cells, as the light-absorbing layer is thinner by a factor of up to 1000 and, hence, material consumption is reduced. Still, absorption rates of thin layers are below those of crystalline silicon cells. Hence, they are used in systems needing little power, such as pocket calculators or watches. Enhanced absorption would make thin-film cells much more attractive for larger applications, such as photovoltaics systems on roofs.

Reference

For further information, please contact Simon Scheuerle, Corporate Communications, Phone: +49 721 608 48761, Email: simon.scheuerle@kit.edu

The post Butterfly wing inspires photovoltaics: Light absorption can be enhanced by up to 200 percent appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/butterfly-wing-inspires-photovoltaics-light-absorption-can-enhanced-200-percent/feed/ 0
Unified Gravity Corporation is to manufacture and sell a fusion-based ion thruster and power generator http://revolution-green.com/unified-gravity-corporation-manufacture-sell-fusion-based-ion-thruster-power-generator/ http://revolution-green.com/unified-gravity-corporation-manufacture-sell-fusion-based-ion-thruster-power-generator/#comments Wed, 15 Nov 2017 13:12:20 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17140 This story grabbed my attention as they are now open to full peer review. Devices can be installed in every household and every car The ultimate goal for the Unified Gravity Corporation is to manufacture and sell a fusion-based ion thruster and power generator for utilities, companies, and private consumers. We believe such power generator […]

The post Unified Gravity Corporation is to manufacture and sell a fusion-based ion thruster and power generator appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>

This story grabbed my attention as they are now open to full peer review.

Devices can be installed in every household and every car

The ultimate goal for the Unified Gravity Corporation is to manufacture and sell a fusion-based ion thruster and power generator for utilities, companies, and private consumers. We believe such power generator devices can be installed in every household and every car. The benefit of this technology is that it is both clean and safe – no radioactive substances are ever produced.

  • Clean and safe for the environment. Runs on lithium. No radioactivity is ever produced
  • Able to satisfy all the needs of a household and the vehicle
  • Every household will be able to get the device

Approach

Hydrogen-lithium fusion contrasts sharply with traditional hot and cold fusion efforts. The different approaches are summarized and compared in the following table

Open for peer-review

We are fully aware our work cannot be explained by the current state of mainstream physics. Despite this, we were able to reproduce positive results in labs at the University of Louisiana, Lafayette and the University of North Texas with further experiments at our Morgan Hill laboratory. Because our fusion technology is patent pending, we are open for peer-review of our experimental tests. We encourage universities, institutions, and companies to explore and reproduce our results as we believe our technology holds the key to unlocking a paradigm shift in the way we create energy.

ugc-reaction-chamber.

They are happy to setup meetings with those who are serious about replication assistance of our fusion process.

History

We began in 2001 with Hubert and Stephen Lipinski’s theoretical research on kinetic energy storage and how this storage effects gravity. Their paper Gravity Theory Based on Mass-Energy Equivalence was published in 2008.

Unified Gravity was established in 2007 in order to experimentally prove the Lipinski’s theory and also to verify if it can be used for efficient power generation. This experimental testing began in 2007 and continued through 2014 in a variety of labs. In 2014, the company opened its own laboratory in Morgan Hill, CA and submitted its patent application for the Hydrogen Lithium Fusion Device, a novel technology to obtain highly energetic alpha particles resulting from proton-lithium fusion.

Currently, further research is being conducted concerning fusion drive ion thruster technology as well as the transfer of energy from alpha particles into direct electric current using various solid state methods. Sign up for the newsletter to get the latest news on our groundbreaking research.

Abstract of Unified Gravity Theory

In this theory, an object is a mass density field in the fabric of space (FS)
that satisfies mass–energy equivalence. In contrast with General Relativity
(GR), the theory posits a preferred reference frame — namely the reference
frame in which the FS is at rest. Also in contrast with GR, gravity
between two objects results from the interaction of their mass density
fields integrated over the entire FS. This interaction results in two types
of gravity: Type I gravity which includes classical gravity, and under certain
conditions, Type II gravity which includes a very strong wave gravity.
Gravity exerted by large on small objects reduces to classical gravity. Gravity
exerted by small on large objects is 3 times the classical value at small
kinetic energies. When the small object becomes relativistic, then gravity
becomes much larger. Every object has a gravity wavelength, and for the
object being acted upon, classical type gravity occurs at distances less than
its gravity wavelength while wave gravity occurs at distances greater than
its gravity wavelength. The theory yields a set of 8 logarithmic singularities
in the gravity force as well as a first-order singularity in the gravity
potential. If the FS is quantized into discrete units, these singularities act
on the FS to effect changes and interactions in mass density fields instantaneously.
As a result, gravity acts instantaneously. We suggest that the
3 degree K cosmic background radiation results from kinetic energy released
by the FS units. The theory then predicts that the rest mass of each FS unit
is 2 proton masses and its characteristic length is approximately 2 mm. We
extend the gravity theory to photons and predict the same results as GR
for the classical experimental tests as well as for the change in period of
binary pulsars. Finally, we show that the gravity theory makes possible
a derivation of the Coulomb force.

Reference

Document on Gravity Theory: http://www.actaphys.uj.edu.pl/fulltext?series=Reg&vol=39&page=2823

Fusion Patent: http://www.unifiedgravity.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/WO2014189799-PAMPH-330-2.pdf

Website: http://www.unifiedgravity.com/

The post Unified Gravity Corporation is to manufacture and sell a fusion-based ion thruster and power generator appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/unified-gravity-corporation-manufacture-sell-fusion-based-ion-thruster-power-generator/feed/ 10
Welch Foundation lauds Goodenough for battery research http://revolution-green.com/welch-foundation-lauds-goodenough-battery-research/ http://revolution-green.com/welch-foundation-lauds-goodenough-battery-research/#comments Tue, 14 Nov 2017 08:45:17 +0000 http://revolution-green.com/?p=17135 After returning from my latest Free Energy Machine bust adventure I found this article while waiting at the Airport. It is a good read but raises a few red flags about the latest Lithium project. . It however pays tribute to one of the great scientists who deserves the accolades. Scientist lauded by Welch Foundation […]

The post Welch Foundation lauds Goodenough for battery research appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>

After returning from my latest Free Energy Machine bust adventure I found this article while waiting at the Airport. It is a good read but raises a few red flags about the latest Lithium project. . It however pays tribute to one of the great scientists who deserves the accolades.

Scientist lauded by Welch Foundation for rethinking how world is powered

October 22, 2017 Updated: October 23, 2017 9:27am

Full Story: http://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Welch-Foundation-lauds-Goodenough-for-battery-12297981.php#photo-14400897

 

Photo: Ilana Panich-Linsman/For The Houston Chronicle

Lower the world’s dependence on fossil fuels

John Goodenough doesn’t carry a cellphone – he doesn’t like interruptions at dinner – but his life’s work keeps them running.

The acclaimed Texas scientist’s research decades ago set the groundwork for the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries that power smartphones, cameras and tablets. Late in his career, the 95-year-old Goodenough hasn’t stopped trying to drive battery science forward.

He and colleague Maria Helena Braga have developed a solid glass electrolyte, creating a new kind of battery cell that could transform electric cars and lower the world’s dependence on fossil fuels.

His accolades keep coming. He’s received several awards recognizing his life’s achievements, including the Draper Prize from the National Academy of Engineering and the National Medal of Science. Alphabet Inc. executive chairman Eric Schmidt cheered the latest development as “promising.”

John B. Goodenough drawing a diagram of a battery on the baord in his office at the University of Texas in Austin, Friday afternoon......12/15/00 photo by Rebecca McEntee/AA-S

This week, Houston’s Welch Foundation will recognize the University of Texas at Austin engineering professor with the $500,000 Robert A. Welch Award in chemistry.

His most recent innovation comes at a crucial time. Scientists must solve the “global problem” of finding new energy sources for our world’s future survival, he said.”We have to find a way to wean the dependence of modern society from the energy stored in our fossil fuels,” he said. “Period. Simple.”

‘Wireless revolution’

Feeling behind in school wasn’t new for Goodenough when he started his physics Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. As a child, his dyslexia went  un diagnosed. but it still stung when, after serving in World War II, an administrator told him he wouldn’t make it as a physicist because he had started too late. He was in his 20s.

From U Chicago, he worked in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Lincoln Laboratory, and he was considering a move to Iran to work in energy when Oxford University asked him to lead its inorganic chemistry lab.

In a battery, electrons move from the anode, a negative pole of the battery, to the positively charged cathode through a circuit, powering a device. An electrolyte between these poles forces electrons into the circuit. The chemical reaction has to be reversible to create a rechargeable battery.

Goodenough’s team at Oxford made a lithium cobalt oxide cathode that would create a high density of stored energy – a major development. It was stable, too.

Battery companies in England and America scoffed, Goodenough recalled. But Japan’s companies took note. That cathode helped form the lithium-ion battery, which Sony soon would use to create mobile phones and camcorders.

“The wireless revolution took off,” he said. Soon, the rechargeable batteries were everywhere.

“Give the electrical engineers some credit for the fact that you have tablets and this, that and the other,” he said. “It’s extraordinary how much information is in there. I’m delighted it’s improving the communications between the people of the world.”

Limitations, however, remained. Batteries have finite numbers of cycles before they must be replaced. Elon Musk’s Tesla cars are “beautiful,” Goodenough said, but they’re expensive, in part because their batteries fade.

Buzz about batteries

Facing a meager retirement in England, Goodenough jumped to UT-Austin in 1986 when the university extended an offer. He stayed curious about batteries and would later become aware of Braga’s work at the University of Porto in Portugal.

Braga, also a physicist, knew Goodenough’s work well, though they are separated in age by decades. Years before they met, she cited a chapter he wrote in a presentation. “I didn’t know him, of course,” she recalled. “I never thought I would.”

In Portugal, Braga saw through her own research that a solid electrolyte – rather than the liquid electrolyte used in the lithium-ion batteries – conducted ions well if the atoms were not locked into specific positions. A special glass made that possible.

The implications were soon clear: The glass was a strong ionic material that allowed for a long life cycle in some battery cells. “This cell is likely different … from what you see in the market,” Braga said.

A venture capitalist in technology reached out to Braga after her first paper on the subject was published. He asked what team she’d like to join so that another university could confirm her results.

“Well, Professor Goodenough’s, of course,” Braga responded, thinking it was unlikely.

Goodenough, meanwhile, had been considering the possibilities with solid electrolytes, and when the two met on UT-Austin’s campus, he was intrigued. Braga eventually took a leave of absence from the University of Porto to move to Texas, where they started working with lithium metal to make coin cells.

The team has already started filing patents, and Goodenough said it may soon announce a new breakthrough, though he won’t reveal the details.

Braga says the two aren’t that different, though they are nearly 50 years apart in age. Braga, as a woman in science, feels she needs to work harder for opportunities and recognition. Goodenough, with his dyslexia, felt the same as a young scientist.

Despite the initial buzz over their batteries, some have questioned their results.

In one essay, Princeton University engineering professor Daniel Steingart called the premise of the reaction “impossible.” He wondered if energy was truly being released by the battery and said the idea seemed to “violate key concepts in thermodynamics, namely the conservation of energy.”

Goodenough said his team has written a rebuttal that has yet to be published. Braga countered with a derivation of the first law of thermodynamics as it relates to their work.

The batteries work, Braga says, and that speaks for itself. They light LEDs – one light in her home office in Portugal has not gone out in two years, she said – and keep watches ticking.

“When you have something that’s completely revolutionary, a completely new concept – they don’t know what to do with it,” Goodenough said. “I believe that we’re going to be able to get you a battery that can power an electric car, that’s safe, low cost and with the energy density you need to be able to get a decent drive.

“It only takes one step at a time. One step at a time.”

‘For good and for evil’

Goodenough’s office – steps away from the batteries lab in Austin – is packed with gifts from researchers around the globe. There’s a still-corked bottle of champagne. A box of green tea. An accumulation from a lifetime of work.

To his left hangs a whiteboard scratched hundreds of times over with equations and scribbles once worth remembering. A red, white and black print of Jesus and his disciples hangs behind his desk, and on a nearby shelf, he’s placed photos of art depicting God creating Adam from the Chartres Cathedral in France.

Goodenough struggled with faith as a child, but his religious identity formed over time. He believes science is not in conflict with two lessons from the Christian faith.

First: Love thy neighbor as thyself.

Second: Love the lord thy God with all your mind and strength.

“Technology is morally neutral – you can use it for good and for evil,” he said. “You can use it to explode bombs under somebody’s vehicle. You can use it to steal a bank account. As scientists, we do the best we can to provide something for society. But if society cannot make the moral decisions that are necessary, they only use it to destroy themselves.”

He pauses.”The chainsaw was a very good idea, but they cut down all the forests in the world.”

And again, this time with a sharp cackle.

“Because people want to make money. Money’s not what it’s all about. Survival should be what it’s all about. We should show respect for the planet earth.”

Worldwide recognition

The Welch Foundation award is the latest for Goodenough, who has earned accolades including the National Medal of Science.

It’s a notable recognition of his work. The award can go to any scientist worldwide.

Welch Foundation Board of Directors chair Charles Tate said Goodenough’s advancements over his lifetime significantly moved the global body of knowledge forward.

“His discoveries entail a body of knowledge far beyond basic chemistry,” he said.

Goodenough says he plans to give the prize money to UT-Austin to invest in equipment and fund research positions.

He hopes to celebrate his 100th birthday at the state’s public flagship.”I would like to continue working as long as I can,” he said. “It’s not for me to decide when I’m going to be taken.”

The post Welch Foundation lauds Goodenough for battery research appeared first on Revolution-Green.

]]>
http://revolution-green.com/welch-foundation-lauds-goodenough-battery-research/feed/ 2