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    Well at least we have a timeline set for this project and I wish them every success. This is an update of the previous story we ran on this.

    Dr Han Lin presented the new supercapacitor at Fresh Science Victoria 2016.

    Australia is devloping supercapacitors made from graphene oxide. They can store as much energy per kilogram as a lithium battery, but charges in minutes, or even seconds, and uses carbon instead of expensive lithium.

    Large-scale production of the graphene that would be needed to produce these high-performance supercapacitors was once unachievable.

    By using low-cost solution-based film synthesis techniques and a laser 3D printer, the researchers are able to produce graphene on a large scale at low cost.

    In addition, the supercapacitors are very strong and flexible, and can therefore also be used to develop extremely flexible and thin batteries that could be built into wearable clothing and other personal accessories.

    Key points: 
    • 10x better energy density than competing devices
    • 10,000x faster charge/discharge rates
    • 10,000 charge/discharge cycles
    • ultra thin and ultra light in weight
    • highly flexible and integratable
    • environmentally friendly due to the absence of chemicals
    • Efficiencies offered through the use of laser printing technology and graphene oxide to create an ultra-efficient energy storage medium in a greatly simplified process.
    • Innovative inter-digital design provides for a much shorter ionic path to maximise energy and power density.

    Other parameters for the Supercapacitor    

    Charge time 1-10 seconds

    Cycle life Minimum 10,000 Cell voltage 1.5 to 2.3

    Energy density (Wh/L) 5 (current state) 50- 60 (target for this project)

    Power density (W/L) Up to 10,000

    Cost per Wh $20 (current state) $0.30 (target for this project)

    Service life 10 to 15 years 1 to 2 years

    Disposal No special requirement, environmentally friendly

    Investment

    First Graphite Limited is to underwrite the spending of $2 million over a two year period to earn a 60% interest in the company that holds the international license First Graphite Limited (ASX:FGR) is pleased to advise of its next step in pursuit of the graphene technology initiative. FGR has entered into a binding Heads of Agreement with Kremford Pty Ltd relating to a graphene oxide based thin film supercapacitor technology for high performance and low cost energy storage; the Bolt Electricity Storage Technology Battery (BEST Battery).

    Proof of concept 

    The current proof-of-concept device has performed slightly higher than current batteries but with all of the advantages that come with physical storage of energy as opposed to chemical storage. The University believes that with additional product development and up-scaling the BEST (Bolt Energy Storage Technology) Battery can be taken from a laboratory success to a commercial prototype within the period of the Agreement. (2 years)

    Earlier Story

    At Swinburne, researchers have developed a new type of battery – a supercapacitor that charges extremely fast.

    Batteries are essential in modern society, however, they have three main disadvantages:

    • They take ages to charge
    • They have a limited life
    • They’re harmful for the environment and require special disposal processes

    In addition, they may explode if they are defective or improperly handled.

    The new supercapacitor can be charged in seconds, used millions of times, and is environmentally friendly.

    It is also safer than ordinary batteries when mistreated and will not explode under any circumstances.

    “Previously, a major problem with supercapacitors has been their low capacity to store energy,” says researcher Dr Han Lin.

    “Now we have overcome this problem by making these supercapacitors from graphene, a material that has a very large surface area available to store energy.

    “Our supercapacitor is extremely efficient, as it charges in a matter of seconds and holds a larger charge for a longer time because it consists of multiple sheets of graphene – creating a very large surface area on which to store energy.

    “What’s more, charging and discharging won’t degrade the battery’s quality, so it can theoretically last for a lifetime – a unique property in the world of batteries.”

    Large-scale production possible

    Dr Lin says large-scale production of the graphene that would be needed to produce these high-performance supercapacitors was once unachievable.

    By using low-cost solution-based film synthesis techniques and a laser 3D printer, the researchers are able to produce graphene on a large scale at low cost.

    In addition, the supercapacitors are very strong and flexible, and can therefore also be used to develop extremely flexible and thin batteries that could be built into wearable clothing and other personal accessories.

    The research has been funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Project grant.

    Dr Lin presented the new supercapacitor at Fresh Science Victoria 2016 earlier this year.

    Reference: 

    http://www.firstgraphite.com.au/attachments/article/144/20170119-Supercapacitor%20release.pdf

    http://www.swinburne.edu.au/news/latest-news/2016/08/superfast-charging-everlasting-batteries.php

     

    Liquid hydrogen may be way forward for sustainable air travel
    New hydronium-ion battery presents opportunity for more sustainable energy storage
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